60 Minutes Commits Child Abuse

Alma Deutscher - Artist's RenderingI saw that 60 Minutes profiled the child musician Alma Deutscher. I thought it odd. Very accomplished young musicians are hardly uncommon. I had season tickets to the Portland Symphony for a few years and it seemed every other performance featured some “great” 12-year-old on the violin or piano or glockenspiel. So why this child? Well, because she wasn’t just a performer; she was a composer. Oh, my! How exciting!

Now I should point out that I’m not using the word “prodigy” because that was a word that was used a lot about me: I was a “mathematical prodigy.” And I loved math. But I wasn’t interested in studying it 8 hours per day and my parents weren’t inclined to push me to do it. Instead, I spent time playing and drawing and putting on plays and generally doing anything that made me happy. I have a hard time believing any child wants to do one thing all the time. But I certainly can’t speak for Alma Deutscher. Nor would I want to. She speaks for herself, although she’s obviously been coached as much as Marjoe.

A Composer! Of 200 Year Old Music!

I was skeptical. Modern classical music is incredibly complex — even the bad stuff. The best stuff is filled with so much creativity that I had a hard time thinking that a 12-year-old would have much to offer. That was certainly true of Mozart. Nothing he wrote was really great until he was well into his 20s. (That’s right folks: Mozart wrote a lot of dreck in his early years.) Clearly, he had talent. But as with word writers, music writers need experience with life.

But I hoped that the compositions of this little girl were limited or even bad modern classical music. So I went to YouTube and found everything I could. I was sorely disappointed. She doesn’t even try to write anything from the last two centuries. Her music sounds like a precocious child’s version of the music before Beethoven. And that makes me think her performances aren’t anything more than her copying other performers. (That’s almost certainly true because it’s pretty much always true of young musicians; they haven’t had the life experience to add anything to the music.)

Great Composing Requires a Life Lived

Great composers do amazing things with their work. They communicate — in great detail. You might just hear a passage as sad, but they aren’t working in generalities. Many composers are known for putting musical jokes in their work. A great composer will tell you a story as clearly as the best writer or filmmaker.

Obviously, composers must study. Mozart studied counterpoint with Giovanni Martini, and the music he created afterward was far more interesting. But it was still years before he wrote anything I ever want to listen to.

But here’s my point: he was trying to write the music of his time. And this supposedly amazing child isn’t interested in any of the music of her own time. Most of it is no more interesting in the juvenilia of Mozart — which he wrote over 200 years ago!

The Classical Music Industry Sucks

This is not to knock Alma Deutscher. She’s a child. But it is a knock on the people who “enjoy” classical music. And it is a major knock on the people who produce classical music. As for her parents, well, I don’t know. But I suspect child abuse just as Marjoe Gortner suffered — just in a different way. I’d love to read the child’s autobiography when she’s 50.

This all makes me think that this poor young girl has been turned into a trained monkey by her parents and the classical music establishment. Almost everything she plays is something she’s written. I listened to her play a middling Mozart concerto that wasn’t really very well done. (She’s better on the violin than the piano.) Great for a little girl. Savaged by critics if performed by an adult. (She doesn’t seem to have even been told the purpose of a cadenza. And why an audience would applaud after the first movement, is unclear to me.)

There is no Brahms that I can find — much less Debussy — much much less Francis Poulenc — much much much less Elliott Carter! It’s almost all sweet music by the child herself.

What a Real Composer Creates

But I ask you, do you think the child composer of this:

Will ever grows up to be the adult composer of something this creative and great?

Not to mention Partita for 8 Voices.

I don’t think so. She might have. But not with all the adults who used her natural gifts to stick her two centuries before her own time. Sure, she’ll get better. But I doubt she’ll break from the music that made her famous. And at 16, she won’t be so cute. And if she’s lucky, she’ll have enough money that she can just quit.

Abused Child: Alma Deutscher

60 Minutes brought her on because they (and most classical music “lovers”) know almost nothing about classical music. Because they could have brought on someone like Masha Diatchenko, who at 15 actually seemed to understand the music she was playing. She didn’t seem like an abused trained monkey:

And listen to her at 23-years-old!

Maybe it’s an American thing. But I weep for Alma Deutscher. She’s being abused. And if she doesn’t know it now, she will soon enough.

Afterword

After reading this, I read the child’s Wikipedia page. It’s interesting that it contains not a single criticism, despite the fact that there has been quite a lot of criticism of her work. I suspect part of her marketing team makes sure that any criticism is removed. But there is much in there that makes the case that she is pushing against the prevailing trend against melody. This is preposterous. She has shown no sign of even being aware of current trends in classical music — or even trends over the last century.

Darius Milhaud once said, “Don’t ever feel discomfited by a melody.” I think modern composers know this. They don’t need to be taught by a precocious child. If they can be, modern classical music is over. But I don’t think it is. I think this child will have no effect whatsoever on the art of classical music. She might drag down the quality of what people listen to. Most classical music “lovers” may finally admit that they only like the music that doesn’t offend their archaic tastes. But the art will move along because of people like Caroline Shaw, even if most listeners aren’t sophisticated enough to enjoy it.

25 thoughts on “60 Minutes Commits Child Abuse

    • Sorry for me that I spend my time listening to great classical music and don’t get all wet over a child composer who composes… like a child? I think sorry for you that you would put so much stock in this child. Don’t you like classical music? Can’t you tell the difference between great classical music and mediocre classical music?

      But I suppose you are angry because I wasn’t attacking Alma Deutscher; I was attacking people like you who don’t actually care about classical music. Will you still be a big Deutscher fan when she is an adult? I doubt it based upon everything I know about how child prodigies are treated once they are no longer cute children.

      Regardless, you made no argument. I assume that means you have no argument. And how could you? Again: I did not attack Alma Deutscher. I attacked a classical music industry and community of listeners who don’t care at all about the music. Child prodigies are just a commodity to be used up and discarded. Shame on you!

      • That’s rather presumptuous of you. Also, she composes contemporary music! The classical period was a long time ago.

        • Actually, everything I’ve heard from here is distinctly Romantic period.

          Given that you seem to like her, why is that not presumptuous? I assume you were doing searches on her and found this article. And it conflicted with your narrative. How presumptuous to call me presumptuous!

          I have a long history of noting just how limited most classical music fans are when it comes to appreciation. So I’m not at all surprised that she’s very popular.

    • Whatever you personally feel about Alma Deutscher, to balance things a bit, maybe we should include the opinions of a few titans in the music business. Maestro Zubin Mehta considers Alma Deutscher to be a genious and a major force in classical music tiday. Maestro Mehta was her patron for the European debut of her opera, “Cinderella” in Vienna. Sir Simon Rattle, current music director of the London Symphony Orchestra cinsiders Alma to be one if the World’s greatest living composers. Daniel Barenboim, Anne-Sophie Mutter, and 21st century composer Jorg Widman all think highly if her. Also. The Salzburg State Opera has commissioned Alma to compose an opera for them. Alma is going to be performing a concert of her own compositions at Carnegie Hall on December 12 with the Orchestra of St Luke’s under the baton of renowned conductor Jane Glover. Whose opiniin hokds any water? Certainly not yours.

      • I don’t know. Whose blog are you commenting on?

        Again, I return to Stewart Lee: I don’t troll the internet looking for people who don’t like him to complain. I know he’s brilliant. Why are you so insecure in your love of this young musician that you feel the need to defend her? I really don’t understand this. But it makes me more certain than ever that I was right. I’m not criticizing the musician. I’m criticizing people like you who have such low expectations of music that you love a child who composes Romantic dreck.

  1. I’m relieved I’m not the only one – but one of about three in the world it seems, who think, as you say, there is, “a child composer who composes… like a child” . This is not to take her down, but to put her into perspective. There is a lot of skill, sure, and talent, and I do think, she loves what she does. But there are quite a lot of young kids who could perform at her level, (or better?) these days, I believe. Flawless, or rather “mistakeless” playing and a nice tone are one thing, but that’s just a part of music – and she is lacking the artistic maturity which make it a true joy to listen. It’s: “Wow, good for her age – pretty – huh – what’s she doing there, okay, she’s just a kid – wow – WEIRD cadenza – okay – whatever – let’s click on a grown up pianist for real music.”
    She was super cute, when she was little, precocious and funny, but perhaps it would be time for her to retire for a while, take classes with some teacher who can help her understand music beyond her present likings, and then return to the stage later?
    I wonder, if she would not be awfully embarrassed as a grown up, if she continued performing and composing (=skillfully sticking together variations of bits of other, well known pieces in a sort of stylistically indifferent fashion?) looking increasingly silly, while people keep letting her believe she is really a great composer.
    Hey, the Beatles had WAY more true creative genius – WAY more! I’d rather compare the Beatles to Mozart for path breaking inventivenss, than Alma.
    I wonder why there is so little critique out there. Perhaps I’m stupid, perhaps musicians really enjoy playing her stuff, perhaps I haven’t listened to her really good pieces yet, but perhaps it’s simply traitorous to good music, to pretend what she does is great art.
    When I want to listen to kids, I listen to choristers, or the Trapp family, or young Judy Garland or some later kid star. But when I want to listen to real classical music I would not seriously choose Alma at present, I’m afraid.
    Perhaps one should class her with people like this Violinist-guy, Andre Rieu and such? People love him, people listen, but it’s not exactly high art, either.
    Alma’s playing makes people happy, so that’s good, but I don’t want those people to go and tell me she is a classical genius and her current music is objectively great – because I’d be tempted to ram REALLY good recordings and composers down their ears in retaliation – again and again and again, until they understand, and can appreciate, and I’d FORCE them to listen to the Berlin Philharmonics and some other good ensembles at exceptionally inspired evenings, so their minds are thenceforth spoilt for any lesser performers until their dying day!

    • I think the issue is that no established critics want to take on the heat of “going after” this child. As you can see, one person here has already taken offense to what I wrote. But the truth is, the silence the most of the critical community is deafening. Most people just don’t write about her at all. There is a huge number of reviews of Caroline Shaw’s work. I think that is because there is a lot to say about it. But with Alma Deutscher, there really isn’t anything to say. If huge numbers of people like her, fine. Huge numbers of people like a lot of dreck. It never stops amusing me that the vast majority of music played on classical music radio stations is Romantic era music — stuff that I don’t hold in very high esteem.

      My biggest problem with Alma Deutscher, however, is that I really do think that the classical music industry is committing a crime. I think that if left to develop normally, she could have become great. I fear that is hopeless now. It’s hard to have spent all your formative years getting applauded for composing this kind of music and to ever break free of it.

      But it isn’t the case that “musicians really enjoy playing her stuff.” I haven’t found any examples of this. She seems always to be performing her own stuff. (That’s not true of her opera, of course.) In general, her music is performed by her. And this has the negative consequence that she isn’t near the top of violinists and pianists of her age. So this is another way that she’s being abused.

      Thanks for commenting! I’ve felt kind of alone on this. As you mentioned: I’m not trying to criticize her. But her fame is an indictment of the classical music industry.

      • I married a piano teacher. (Marriage under construction.*). And she’s quite clear to parents: if you want your kid to be a classical music star, she can refer you elsewhere. She taught at a music academy which was about stardom, not the love of music for its own sake. Fled as fast as her feet could carry her. That place still exists, and it’s still just as horrible, hasn’t changed one iota.

        (* — In Minnesota, we have a saying. There’s snow-shoveling season, snow-melting season, and road construction season. Because when water freezes and melts, well, you know. It f-s up the road and sidewalk pavement pretty badly!)

        • It seems an odd with for a parent. For even very talented people, their best outcome is that they end up in the string section of a major orchestra. While being a flutist in a major orchestra is thrilling, I’ve never met a string player that found it any more edifying than I find my professional writing career. (They, of course, find edification outside their paying work — like most people.)

          On the other hand, music education is great for kids. It’s sad when parents foist their own dreams on their children — especially when those dreams are not very realistic.

          • Having met the family, I must confirm that it is not Professor and Dr Deutscher who are foisting their dreams on their children, but rather the other way round.

            Professor Guy Deutscher told me last month that he had had to put his own career as a published expert on linguistics on hold in order to concentrate on his daughter’s, which is taking off. He can write his next book as soon as Alma comes of age, and legally off his hands. Right now, he is her legal guardian and has a duty to safeguard her interests.

            She has been booked at the Carnegie Hall in New York in December (the entire programme is given over to her own compositions), and this doesn’t often happen to someone at any point in their careers, and even less to a teenager. There are 2800 seats to fill there, but not only do I think it is quite realistic she will get a good audience, the likelihood is that it will sell out months before the doors open.

            • > Having met the family, I must confirm that it is not Professor and Dr Deutscher who are foisting their dreams

              Met?! So your one meeting was all you needed because show-biz families never put on a show for outsiders. Regardless, where were you when she was three?

      • Having met the family, I must confirm that it is not Professor and Dr Deutscher who are foisting their dreams on their children, but rather the other way round.

        Professor Guy Deutscher told me last month that he had had to put his own career as a published expert on linguistics on hold in order to concentrate on his daughter’s, which is taking off. He can write his next book as soon as Alma comes of age, and legally off his hands. Right now, he is her legal guardian and has a duty to safeguard her interests.

        She has been booked at the Carnegie Hall in New York in December (the entire programme is given over to her own compositions), and this doesn’t often happen to someone at any point in their careers, and even less to a teenager. There are 2800 seats to fill there, but not only do I think it is quite realistic she will get a good audience, the likelihood is that it will sell out months before the doors open.

        In response to an earlier comment, Alma has actually worked with the Vienna Philharmonic, has collaborated with Vienna State Opera, and has had a new opera commissioned by the Salzburg State Theatre, which she is currently working on. She was also presented by former Austrian Chancellor Kurz at a memorial gala for the Holocaust, and a few weeks later to entertain a visiting president during an official State Visit, at which Alma Deutscher set a popular song from the president’s home country to a Viennese waltz, melding the two together as a gesture of friendship between the two nations that both leaders much appreciated.

        She doesn’t trust other musicians to perform her work to an acceptable standard unless she is there to supervise them. This irritates other musicians, but it cannot be helped. Sometimes composers have foibles and are often a law unto themselves.

        Responding to the anomymous comment, the Beatles are the first to admit they were heavily influenced by American popular music arriving off the ships in Liverpool in the 1950s, and some of McCartney’s work is derivative of his father’s New Orleans jazz band – ‘Honey Pie’ and ‘When I’m Sixty Four’ come immediately to mind. George Harrison’s fascination with Indian classical music is legendary. It was a Richard Strauss lullaby that inspired Alma Deutscher to get into music. Not quite rock-and-roll, but then we’re not all alike.

        What got me taking notice was ‘The Dance of the Solent Mermaids’ – a piece for string orchestra commissioned by a festival on the Isle of Wight back in 2014, which she fully orchestrated a year later. I am familiar with the dances Sir Edward Elgar composed for the Powick Lunatic Asylum Band, when he was employed there as a bandmaster. Alma Deutscher at ten was producing music of a similar quality to what Elgar was producing at thirty.

        • ..Nobody will ever read this, I expect, but just reading the comment, and replies, and realizing that I myself must have been the “Anonymous Poster”, another few lines from (possibly very opinionated) me.

          Regarding the Beatles: Of course they were influenced by the skiffle movement, which took off in England when the U.S. folk revival drifted over the ocean, and merged folk/ spirituals with early elvis etc. – apparently there was a band at every street corner & every other living room in some places in England back then! Some playing on actual washboards or spoons.
          I suppose there would have been no Beethoven without Mozart, and no Schubert without Beethoven..
          What matters is not the initial inspiration – or even taking (knowingly on subconsciously) whole themes, melodies or songs – but what you make of these things, and what comes after.
          Without Elvis & Pete Seeger possibly no Beatles – with no Beatles probably no Rolling Stones and no quite a lot of other pathbreaking developments and off-branchings in Pop Music.
          Even though, from a technical point of view the Beatles had way less training, skill and knowledge than Alma Deutscher had a ten, they used what they had in such a way, that they wrote very original stuff, in a new style, that could stand on it’s own, and in their particular time and genre were pathbreaking, iconoclastic and vastly influential to other musicians & musical developments. (I think.)
          That’s what I simply couldn’t see for Alma Deutscher when I wrote my above comment.
          I didn’t see her purported genre – serious classical music – or even film music or anything – being in any meaningful way inspired by her compositions so far.
          (She might have made major leaps in the mean time, but I’ll just wait and see what she does when she’s twenty five or thirty – if she’s still around & I hear her name spoken in awe then, I’ll give it a shot. It’s not about “she did at eleven-what-he-did-at.-thirty” for me, but “is it good music that I need to listen to”.

          I believe, she is not being abused, but really has alot of passion & drive, but she has so far been booked, because she is a child and cute, and amazing – and people pay to watch her play – NOT because her music was really that great so far.
          Quite honestly – she is amazing in many ways & has a great stage personality – she is simply adorable – but it’s also – cringy, a bit.

          On another note: I love (quality) romantic music, and I don’t think it’s dreck. I’m a simple soul, and personally do like to listen to beautiful music that does have a melody and expression. (I’m with you there, Alma!)

  2. So much of what the author is writing is founded on prejudice, received wisdom, fashionable social theory and sour grapes. Maybe he is just playing devil’s advocate?

    I have had the benefit of meeting the girl and spending a couple of hours with her discussing music among other things over lunch. I am eager to perform one of her compositions myself at a concert. Since none of her work is yet published, this means getting the permission of the copyright holder and, because she is a minor, also her legal guardian. Anything else would be abuse.

    My impression of her was that of a very capable professional musician, already with seven years of concert experience, and was going about her work – that of making sure the orchestra performs her composition to the standard she expects – capably and professionally. Her age was immaterial. She admitted one shortcoming to me – she had never orchestrated for the harp before, and was finding in rehearsal that her scoring was unplayable. The harp needs a bar’s notice to change key, since a pedal must be worked to change all the strings round. She was changing key with every note in one phrase, which really upset the harpist. Still, we all learn by our mistakes. I suggested she listen to a piece by Graham Fitkin – an hour-long thing he did for an aerial theatre company in 2013 written entirely for the harp.

    The other thing I felt about her was that being so young is a bit of a nuisance, holding her up in her work, but it cannot be helped. Getting older is actually quite a blessing. This though is quite a common feeling among teenagers. I wanted to buy her a beer, but she asked for apple juice. I had forgotten she is only 14 and is not allowed alcohol.

    I was also raised in the same town in England that she was, and one of my nieces also has a Jewish father and and an English mother.

    It all comes down to taste. Alma Deutscher, from an early age, decided what music she finds pleasing, and what doesn’t. Nobody has any right to dictate what someone else is supposed to like, least of all when we adults go all heavy-handed on them saying that the under-aged cannot consent to what they enjoy, but must do and think and feel as the grown-ups tell them.

    I grew up with the Beatles and used to tape Alan Freeman’s ‘Pick of the Pops’ show as a teenager. My elders and betters hated my taste in music, and lamented the “youth of today” with their hedonism and lack of moral fibre. So it is with Alma Deutscher.

    She so happens to be a high romantic, a pre-Raphaelite with an enhanced sense of what is beautiful, and a determination to bring this beauty to her own century. A lot of people in high places, and well established in their careers insist that art should be about reflecting the ugliness of the present time as a form of self-expression. Alma Deutscher the teenager is rebelling against this orthodoxy, and upsetting her elders, as we read in this article. Nothing has changed there – the grumpy middle-aged will always complain about youth!

    • > I have had the benefit of meeting the girl

      So you are just being objective whereas my opinion is biased because it is only based on listening to her music. My opinions are not based on “received wisdom”; they are based on decades of listening to music and developing increasingly demanding tastes.

      I really don’t understand the people who feel the need to defend the honor of this child — especially since my article is not an attack on her but of the sad level of classical music appreciation and of the commodification of music by those in the industry. The responses to this article show that I was quite right about the former.

  3. So much of what the author is writing is founded on prejudice, received wisdom, fashionable social theory and sour grapes. Maybe he is just playing devil’s advocate?

    I have had the benefit of meeting the girl and spending a couple of hours with her discussing music among other things over lunch. I am eager to perform one of her compositions myself at a concert. Since none of her work is yet published, this means getting the permission of the copyright holder and, because she is a minor, also her legal guardian. Anything else would be abuse.

    My impression of her was that of a very capable professional musician, already with seven years of concert experience, and was going about her work – that of making sure the orchestra performs her composition to the standard she expects – capably and professionally. Her age was immaterial. She admitted one shortcoming to me – she had never orchestrated for the harp before, and was finding in rehearsal that her scoring was unplayable. The harp needs a bar’s notice to change key, since a pedal must be worked to change all the strings round. She was changing key with every note in one phrase, which really upset the harpist. Still, we all learn by our mistakes. I suggested she listen to a piece by Graham Fitkin – an hour-long thing he did for an aerial theatre company in 2013 written entirely for the harp.

    For her latest work ‘Siren Sounds’, Alma Deutscher opens with a totally modernistic sound picture – the traffic sounds of a busy city, with emergency sirens, car horns and the rumbling of traffic. Slowly, it is transformed into her heavy romantic style before becoming a full-blown Viennese waltz Johann Strauss II could have written, but the wail of the police sirens are worked into the dance. Firstly it shows that she is quite capable of writing modernistic music if she wants to, but rather chooses not to. She explained that she wanted to take the ugly sounds of the city, Vienna, where she had moved to after the lush green landscape of southern England, and make even these beautiful within her music. There is no reason why we cannot have beauty even in this century; it need not belong only in the past.

    The other thing I felt about her was that being so young is a bit of a nuisance, holding her up in her work, but it cannot be helped. Getting older is actually quite a blessing. This though is quite a common feeling among teenagers. I wanted to buy her a beer, but she asked for apple juice. I had forgotten she is only 14 and is not allowed alcohol.

    I was also raised in the same town in England that she was, and one of my nieces also has a Jewish father and and an English mother.

    It all comes down to taste. Alma Deutscher, from an early age, decided what music she finds pleasing, and what doesn’t. Nobody has any right to dictate what someone else is supposed to like, least of all when we adults go all heavy-handed on them saying that the under-aged cannot consent to what they enjoy, but must do and think and feel as the grown-ups tell them.

    I grew up with the Beatles and used to tape Alan Freeman’s ‘Pick of the Pops’ show as a teenager. My elders and betters hated my taste in music, and lamented the “youth of today” with their hedonism and lack of moral fibre. So it is with Alma Deutscher.

    She so happens to be a high romantic, a pre-Raphaelite with an enhanced sense of what is beautiful, and a determination to bring this beauty to her own century. A lot of people in high places, and well established in their careers insist that art should be about reflecting the ugliness of the present time as a form of self-expression. Alma Deutscher the teenager is rebelling against this orthodoxy, and upsetting her elders, as we read in this article. Nothing has changed there – the grumpy middle-aged will always complain about youth!

    • If your article doesn’t post, it means it has to be approved. I believe the system displayed a note explaining this.

  4. You say you aren’t criticizing Alma Deutscher yet you call her music “dreck” a Yiddish word for “trash” or “rubbish.” Besides being commissioned to compose an opera for the Salzburg National Opera, the Vienna State Opera will be doing a repeat performance of a very successful series for children of the condensed version of Alma’s opera Cinderella. Obviously you have not kept up with the reviews in the international press of her sold out performances of Cinderella and her piano and violin concerti. Alma has performed in some of Europe’s leading music festivals including the prestigious Lucerne Festival in Switzerland. You are free, of course, to express your own opinion but, quite frankly, for an opinion to carry any weight, it must be backed up by fact. As I have written in a previous post some of classical music’s most venerable figures think very highly of Ms. Deutscher’s abilities as both a composer and performer such as Maestri Zubin Mehta, Daniel Barenboim, Sir Simon Rattle, Jane Glover, and Anne-Sophie Mutter. Of course the “modernists” and “higher critics” think very little of her music because she has, by design, chosen not to conform to the discordant, atonal, formulaic music of the 21st century but has chosen , instead, to compose music that has form and melody and that is why she has appered before sold out audiences all over the world.

    • I’m not criticizing Deutscher; I am criticizing her music relative to other modern composers whose reputations are not based on their ages.

      Indeed I have kept up with all of her glowing reviews. It is telling that almost all reviews of her are (1) positive and (2) shallow. If you could get past your outrage over my not caring for the child’s music, you would see that this is an indictment of the classical music industry. And I am well aware of all the claims made that she has chosen “to compose music that has form and melody.” Of course, even saying this shows that you don’t understand modern composition, which has form and melody. Did you not listen to the Caroline Shaw string quartet? Or do you not have the time — addicted as you are to child composers?

      Finally: she is popular because she is young. If she had burst onto the scene as a 30-year-old, no one would pay to see her. Read a biography of Mozart. (BTW: Mozart didn’t compose much of interest until he was in his 20s. But his juvenilia was very popular!)

  5. I agree with one thing: When Alma Deutscher is fully adult she will write more emotionally powerful music. Everything else you write is nonsense. Having written a few lines of music myself, I love her, I love her, I love her. I am thrilled that Mozart’s sister has come back to life and is stalking the land and will sweep all before her with her pencil and her violin.

  6. I have wept, danced, and laughed with this girls music. i find it very emotionally powerful. Just b/c its melodic does not mean its not. And i love John Cage and tons of dissonant post modern music. And hers is already all the way up there, regardless of her age. This is an angry cynical blog written by someone with an obvious axe to grind..

    • Now that you’ve psychoanalyzed me, perhaps we can set up weekly sessions…

      But do tell: what John Cage pieces do you like?

      One of my favorite:

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